Can you scuba dive with heart arrhythmia?

Can I scuba dive with arrhythmia?

Permission to dive will usually be refused if an applicant has either serious underlying cardiac disease (e.g. ischaemic heart disease or cardiomyopathy), or arrhythmias are associated with symptoms which would prove hazardous if they occurred underwater (e.g. syncope, dizziness, dyspnoea, or angina).

Can you scuba dive with a heart condition?

In a well-controlled environment (warm water, no wind or current), an individual with coronary disease and good left ventricular function could dive safely with no more than 4 mets of energy expenditure (i.e. 8 mets peak capacity). Improving aerobic capacity after PCI or CABG is also essential to safe diving.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes and many cardiac conditions were long considered absolute contraindications to scuba diving.

What are the side effects of scuba diving?

Diving does entail some risk. Not to frighten you, but these risks include decompression sickness (DCS, the “bends”), arterial air embolism, and of course drowning. There are also effects of diving, such as nitrogen narcosis, that can contribute to the cause of these problems.

Can I scuba dive with high blood pressure?

As long blood pressure is controlled; exercise capacity is unaffected; and the heart, brain, kidneys and blood vessels are not damaged so as to impose risk of sudden incapacitation, diving is not a problem.

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Does scuba diving affect blood pressure?

Scuba diving can be a great way to keep fit and provide a workout for your heart. However, diving can have significant effects on the body, including increasing blood pressure, which could pose a risk when diving, or a risk to your health in general.

When should you not scuba dive?

If you’re generally fit and healthy, there should be no problem. You will be required to sign a medical statement before learning to dive. If you’re already certified to dive, avoid diving if you’re not feeling one hundred percent. In particular, don’t dive if you’ve got a head cold or a hangover.

When should you not dive?

The general rule that seems to be widely agreed upon is that you should wait 12 hours after a single no-decompression dive, 18 hours after multiple dives or multiple days of diving and at least 24 hours after dives requiring decompression stops.

Can asthmatics go scuba diving?

Diving may be hazardous to the lung function of patients with asthma. Despite the risks of SCUBA diving, many asthmatic individuals can dive without serious diving events. Diving evaluations for asthmatic patients have focused on a thorough patient history, spirometry, allergy testing, and bronchial challenges.