Tag Archive | beer

MillerCoors Brewery Tour


1-13-16

Miller Brewery crop IMG_4278

Welcome to Miller Valley!

Miller Valley IMG_0787

We realized how much of Milwaukee we still have not seen, and decided that taking the free tour of the MillerCoors Brewery was just the thing on a snowy winter day. In this picture you can see the large silver tankards where the beer is aged for three weeks.

The tour is for one hour, be prepared to take stairs and walk to several buildings.  Register at the front desk when you arrive. Good info to know before beginning the tour.

Tour Info IMG_0807

 A photographer was there to take our picture and had some props to make the picture even more memorable.  We would be offered a 5×7 and 2-4×6 print, a bottle opener and a can cozy at the end of the tour for $20.  We got it, such a fun memento of our visit.

Miller Visitor Center in Milwaukee

We were on the first tour at 10:30, and it turned out to only be the two of us. Leah was our guide, she gave us the VIP treatment!

Leah and us IMG_0819

The tour began with a 10-minute film in the theater describing the history of the brewery. After that we went to the first building where the beer is made.

Beer Processing at Miller IMG_0827

Here we could also see the conveyor belt rolling with filled cases of beer.

We went down to the lower floor of this building and saw it is also a vast warehouse for all the beer.  Would you believe all of this will be gone by the next day?  Most goes to Chicago with the rest points elsewhere. It is the size of 5 football fields placed side-by-side. Here are some stats.

Beer Distribution stats at Miller IMG_0855

Beer Warehouse IMG_0852

We went back out and crossed the street, going under the bridge where you could see beer going across on the conveyor.

Miller Bridge IMG_0865

It was time to see where the Fermenting Room.  Copper tankards were on the upper level and the silver-colored ones were below.

Fermenting room at Miller

Miller Fermenting Facts IMG_0883

After this we walked further up the street to our last stop, the Historic Caves building where the beer was chilled before refrigeration.

Brewery Panoramic View IMG_0899

There was also a historic marker on the building.

Historic Caves Entrance at Miller IMG_0901

Plank Road Historic Marker at Brewery

We went into the hushed darkness of the cave, gently lit on either side but still allowing for night vision.  It was beautiful, and there was a mural painted in the back.

Miller Cave IMG_0910

Miller Cave IMG_0915

Miller Cave Mural IMG_0912

In here were were also paid a visit by Frederick Miller himself, via a projection on the back of the cave.

Very cool!  The tour was now finished, we then went to the tasting room. Al did the tasting since I don’t drink beer.  Thanks Leah, we really had fun!

Tasting Room IMG_0934

Tasting Room back at Miller IMG_0936

While we were there we got our photo that we had taken at the start of the tour.  Our first silly selfie of the year.

Miller Tour Selfie text

We really had a good time here today. Since there is not a restaurant on site, we went .7 miles away to Saz’s State House for a great lunch.

Saz's State House in Milwaukee IMG_0975

It’s always Miller Time™ in Milwaukee!

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Potosi Brewing Company – A Tradition since 1852


9-5-15

Potosi town signPotosi Marker

After visiting Hazel Green we headed here to the Potosi Brewing Company to see what all the buzz was about. The scenery is beautiful, the bluff makes a great backdrop to the red brick buildings. Potosi is also one of the 33 towns on the Great River Road that goes alongside the Mississippi. Another one we have been to is Dickeyville.

Approaching Potosi Brewery

We first went to the right side, where the big beer can is located. The grounds are quite beautiful in the summer. We HAD to get a selfie at the big beer can  🙂  Al is 6’3″ so you can see how big it is.  It is the work of Scott Haverland Plastering, made in 2007.

Potosi Brewing Co. grounds

Potosi Beer selfie

After looking around here we went to the main brewery building. A lot of activity here, the National Brewery Museum is located her on the 2nd and 3rd floors, $5 admission is charged. We just stayed on the lower level where there were also a few displays also.

Potosi Museum displays

Potosi Brewing Co. Wagon

Beer Can display in Potosi

The Cave was especially interesting.

The Cave entrance in Potosi

Inside the cave inn Potosi

The brewery also has a restaurant which was hoppin’.

Potosi Brewing Company Restaurant

Potosi Brewing Co. Restaurant

You can eat outside too on their patio.

Potosi Brewery Patio

All their beer is made from natural spring water on site, and you can see it flowing under the restaurant through a window in the floor, cool!

Window in floor of Potosi Brewery

You can see the water flow outside too.

Spring water in Potosi

In the back of the restaurant you can see some tanks where the beer is being fermented and tanks of ready-to-serve beer.  Since we were driving we enjoyed a refreshing root beer on a warm day, they make that too.

Beer Tanks in Potosi

There are some other businesses across from the brewery.  Whispering Bluffs Winery and Blue Boy Market.

Whispering Bluffs Winery and Blue Boy Market

Gary David Woodworking and Design

Gary David Woodworking and Design

We really glad we stopped here today, it was worth the visit to this historic brewery.

Reedsburg – Where Business, Technology and Tradition Converge


3-26-15

Reedsburg sign

Reedsburg is a city of 10,000 not real far from the Wisconsin Dells or Baraboo.  This community has a long history, settled in the late 1840’s. You can’t miss the tall flagpole when you enter the city, it marks the beginning of the Main Street Historic downtown. Walking tour booklets of all the historic districts  are available here.

Reedsburg Flagpole

The city commemorates early settlers, James and Rebecca Babb on the bank of the Baraboo River that flows through town.  “Babb’s Ford” helped get people and supplies across the river in the early days of the settlement.

Babb's Ford MarkerBabb's Ford Dedication

The former Woolen Mill was also located here, and some of the equipment in the mill are in a glass case near this marker.

Woolen Mill Building in Reedsburg

Woolen Mill Picker display and Plaque

On the other side of the bridge in a timber monument and time capsule dedicated to the early settlers of Reedsburg.

Timber Monument in Reedsburg

Timber Monument Plaque in Reedsburg

The city is also located on the 90th meridian, and is marked by a granite monument near the big flagpole.

Reedsburg 90th Meridian marker

The railroad has been an important part of Reedsburg history for a long time. The Chicago and Northwestern Railway arrived in 1872. The depot still stands and is now the home of the Chamber of Commerce. You can get your trail pass for the 400 State Trail here too.

Reedsburg Depot

There are several murals in Reedsburg, both inside buildings and outside. This one is located inside the historic Post Office, still used for that purpose. It is dedicated to agriculture.

Reedsburg Post Office and Mural

Dedicated to the Woolen Mill.

Woolen Mill Mural in Reedsburg

“Hops or Bust” Mural, dedicated to the growing of hops for the production of alcohol. Reedsburg celebrates its brewing heritage with the annual Fermentation Fest in October. The old brewery still stands, now converted to housing.

Hops Boom or Bust Mural

Reedsburg Brewery Building

The brewery and many more interesting buildings are located in the Park Street Historic District, and we looked at the many interesting building and houses there. Love that purple one!

Park Street Historic District in Reedsburg

Park Street Historic District in Reedsburg collage

The former municipal hospital has been converted to senior housing, beautiful building.

Former Reedsburg Municipal Hospital

After all our exploring we enjoyed a great lunch at the Deli Bean Cafè, their paninis were delicious!

Deli Bean in Reedsburg

Enjoy a great day in historic Reedsburg!

Downtown Reedsburg

Delafield – One Day is Not Enough


3-1-12 & 9-23-14 & 5-30-18

Delafield sign

Delafield is a scenic community of 7,000 in Waukesha county 53 miles east of Madison on the shores of Nagawicka Lake.

Lake Nagawicka in Delafield

We had not been here for two years and it was time to see more of the city during a beautiful time of year.  The first stop was the Chamber of Commerce to get information about the city.

Delafield Chamber of Commerce

The chamber is within sight of the Fish Hatchery building with an interesting history.

Delafield Fish HatcheryDelafield Fish Hatchery marker

 The hatchery is also next to the beautiful Veterans Memorial Riverwalk honoring all veterans. It is a 3/4 mile path partially along St. John’s Pond.

Veterans Memorial Riverwalk headstone

St. John's Pond in Delafield

 

There are many historic sites and buildings in Delafield, one close to here is Hawk’s Inn at 426 Well’s St., built in 1846.  It was moved there in 1960 when it was going to be burned as a fire department exercise.  It was once a busy stagecoach stop, now a museum open May-October. Also on site is a historic marker.

Hawk's Inn in DelafieldHawk's Inn marker

Just behind the Hawk’s Inn on the hill is the historic Delafield Hotel.

Delafield Motel

C A Designs downtown is in what used to be the Dance Hall for Hawk’s Inn.  All information about Hawk’s Inn and this building provided by the Hawk’s Inn Historical Society.

C A Designs in Delafield

Aeva Wedding and Party is in an 1868 Presbyterian church building.

Auva Wedding and Party in Delafield

 Part of the charm of Delafield is the building design in the historic downtown. The design is Colonial Williamsburg, a place we hope to get to someday.  And we have enjoyed the diversity of businesses both downtown and in other areas of the city. This is Clock Tower Square.

Downtown Delafield

 The Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory is a delightful place for sweet treats.

Daybreak Mobile in Delafield

The gas station downtown even has style! This is Daybreak Mobile across from Clock Tower Square. The pumps are BEHIND the station, therefore, preserving the street view. At the edge of town is The Montage.

From the 1970’s to 2002, this barn used to have a Smiley face on it, greeting people going by.  In 2018 it is re-opening as The Smiley Barn in August. Owner Maria Luther is pleased that the smile was approved by the planning commission and we were at the meeting May 30 to lend support. See video here of TMJ4 coverage of this meeting.

We head up the street to St. John’s Northwestern Military Academy to see their historic buildings. The first one is the Church of St. John Chrysotom, known as “The Little Red Church on the Hill”, dating back to 1851.  The style of this church is “Carpenter Gothic”. The builders re-created the style of the stone churches in England using oak trees from the shore of Okauchee Lake.  Bell tower is a separate structure. The church still holds weekly services.

Little Red Church

Bell tower at Red Church in Delafield

East Gate Entrance at. St. John's in Delafield

 We go through the East entrance and ahead of us is the Beacon, a monument dedicated to the founder of St. John’s.  A guide took us on a tour and he told us the light inside always is on. The legend circulated amongst the students, school is canceled for the day if the light is dark. He said classes still go on if the light is out, LOL!

The Beacon

 We could hear music, it turns out the choir in the chapel were practicing for Veteran’s Day. Let’s listen to them sing “The National Anthem” while viewing other buildings on the campus.

We thanked our guide for the campus tour and continued on.

We have enjoyed food at three places in Delafield. For great bread, the Great Harvest Bread Co. They even let you try samples before buying.

 

Great Harvest Bread Company in Delafield

Great Harvest Bread Company in Delafield

 Also Revere’s Wells St. Tavern in 2012, great food there too!

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On our visit this year we enjoyed a great lunch at Delafield Brewhaus. That is just a few of many places in Delafield to dine.

Delafield Brewhaus

 Our last stop on our 2nd visit was to a great lookout at Lapham Peak State Park. What a great view! We could see Lake Nagawicka and even Holy Hill over 20 miles away. We were over 1,200 feet high!

Lapham Peak sign

Lapham Peak marker

 

Plaque near lookout tower on a large rock. Also the tower itself.

Lapham Peak plaque

 

The view from the top, all the way to Hubertus!

Lapham Peak tower

Holy Hill From Lapham Peak in Delafield

Delafield has it all! One day is not enough and we plan on coming back again soon!

Delafield lamp post banner

It’s Amore on Brady Street – Milwaukee


5-21-14

Brady Street is a street with character and spunk.  It was settled by mainly Italian immigrants over a century ago and their decendants still own many businesses on this colorful street.  The TV show “Around the Corner with John McGivern” inspired us to come here.  He was right, what a fun place in the heart of Wisconsin’s largest city. Watch it here too.

We arrived early on this beautiful spring morning with businesses starting to open.  Brady St. has parking meters. If you don’t mind walking a couple blocks, we parked on the side of the street by Cass Park to park free. Great park for kids to enjoy. We couldn’t resist posing under the big cat archway.

Cass Park arch Milwaukee

We continued our walk and saw another little park, redbuds in bloom.

Park at N. Marshall and E. Lyon St.

We see a banner on the light pole as we reach Brady Street.

Brady Street banner

 

The first business we saw was Glorioso’s Italian Market, a wonderful place with lots of great food, some imported from Italy. We even had lunch there too, yum! Bring a cooler in the summer, you may be bringing home some of their meat and cheeses.

Glorioso's Collage

Another great place we stopped at was Dryhootch Coffee House. They have a special mission, they donate part of their proceeds to help vets. Learn more about this specific store here.   Our barista made us delicious café au laits and made us welcome! Al fit right in, being a Navy vet himself.

Dryhootch Coffee House

 

Thumbs up to Dryhootch!

Thumbs up to Dryhootch!

Berry Me Frozen Yogurt is another popular place.

Berry Me  on Brady St. Milwaukee

 

We reach one end of the street, The Dogg Haus is ready to serve up Chicago specialties.

The Dogg Haus

After lunch at Glorioso’s, we went to see the part of Brady St. we missed.  The street being 9 blocks long, there was a lot to see. St. Hedwig – Three Holy Women Catholic Church has been a cornerstone of this community since 1886.

St. Hedwig Catholic Church Milwaukee

The Dragonfly is a unique store inside as well as out, a gargoyle sits atop the roof overlooking Brady Street.

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The Dragonfly in Milwaukee

 

Well, we finally make it to the other end of Brady Street. We come upon a bridge overlooking the Milwaukee River. What a view! This is the right side.

IBridge near Brady St. Milwaukee Right side view

 

The left side..You can see a couple canoeing down the river.  This will take you all the way down to where we were last year, the Milwaukee Ale House.

Brady Street Bridge left side

 

Milwaukee Ale House

Near the bridge is McCormack-Mervis Brady Street park, ending our journey today.  We hope you enjoyed Brady Street, we plan on returning again. What a fun day!

McCormack-Mervis Brady Street Park

 

Brady Street Park Milwaukee

Mount Horeb- The Troll Capitol of the World!


10-8-12

Mount Horeb is a friendly community founded in 1867.  It is southwest of Madison and its strong Norwegian roots are seen in the buildings throughout the city.  What really put this friendly community on the map are the adorable carved-wood trolls. The trolls became a fixture in Mt. Horeb in the mid-80’s  when a bypass was built to go around the city. The residents were worried less people would stop to visit, so the Trollway was created as an attraction to draw people off the bypass. It worked and the community sees plenty of visitors throughout the year coming to enjoy the many festivals and attractions offered. This downloadable map will help you find the trolls.  This friendly sign greets you as you enter town, having recently celebrated it’s 150th anniversary in 2011.

Mt. Horeb Roundabout sign

Stop by the visitor center first if open, they have publications from the area to with local information to help you enjoy your visit!

Mt. Horeb Welcome Center

Here are some of the many trolls, also Brutus the Dragon guarding the Visitor Center.

Troll Collage

Let’s go on a Troll Stroll.

Mount Horeb also has a beautiful historic downtown with many businesses for great shopping and eating. Learn more about it here.

Downtown Mt. Horeb

We have enjoyed lunch at Schubert’s Diner and Bakery. They even have lefse if the craving hits.

Schubert's

For a local brew in a friendly atmosphere, The Grumpy Troll is anything but!

The Grumpy Troll

Mt. Horeb is a community that likes the outdoors, and one of their popular attractions is the Military Ridge Trail that goes right through town, leading you to Ridgeway if you don’t stop. We had biked on this trail many times. Stop by the Visitor’s Center or self-register for a trail pass here.

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If you plan on staying a bit longer than a day, The Village Inn Motel is a nice place to stay. More choices here.

Village Inn Motel

Well, our visit is done. Wayne waves goodbye and hopes you come back soon!

Waving Wayne