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Barn Quilt and Dairy Farm Tour




Barn Quilt Tour Video-90 minutes

Green County Cheese Days in Monroe is back again, and this year I planned on taking the Barn Quilt and DeVoe Dairy Farm Tour. I had not done this before and I was excited! Our guides are Kris Winkler and Lynn Lokken. I went alone since Al couldn’t come with me on Saturday.  The tour was sold out with over 60 people filling the bus!

 

We headed out at 11 AM, Kris and Lynn gave a running commentary during the tour. We saw a great many barn quilts.  To do your own tour, you can get the map from the Green County Visitor and Activity Guide. There is a pull-out map in the middle of the publication. You can also see a Google map of the barn quilt locations from the website, Green County Barn Quilts.  We saw as many as we could in 2 1/2 hours.  Here is a small sample of the quilts we saw.

Kris and Lynn also pointed out several businesses and cheese-making places along the route.  The first was Rackow’s Family Sausage with the distinctive pink silo!

This quilt was mentioned but we didn’t see it on the tour.  This one was modeled after a scuba diving flag, a sport we participated in together for many years. It’s called, “Live and Let Dive”, #141 on the map.

The Maple Leaf Cheese factory in Monroe. They are the source of the famous fried cheese curds sold at Cheese Days by the Monroe Optimist Club.

Al and I saw this place in October (not on the tour), the Maple Leaf Cheese Store in Juda where we enjoyed a treat!

On the tour, we also got a sneak preview of a brand-new goat and sheep dairy farm that is still in development. It’s called Ms. J and Co.  This farm will be able to provide sheep and goat milk on a larger scale to cheese producers in Wisconsin. They are predicted to come online in 2020. It’s possible we may get a tour here at Cheese Days in two years!

And now, our visit to the DeVoe Dairy Farm for our tour!

Our first part of the tour was in the milking parlor. Yvonne DeVoe does all the milking on the farm and you can tell she loves her cows! ❤  The “head cow” is Adele, she mooed a few times for us too 🙂

Next, our group moved over to the farmyard, where we saw chickens, goats, pigs, donkey, and other animals. Oldest daughter Katlyn took over from here.

She also showed us a couple of newborn calves. She carried them in and out of the barn like they were light. Really, they might be at least 60 pounds!

Then, we adjourned to enjoy some ice-cold milk, cheese, and ice cream!

Our hosts Lynn and Kris serving snacks to all the tour participants.

I even said “Hi” to Alice in Dairyland 2018, Kaitlyn Riley!  A nice young lady doing a great job representing Wisconsin. After the tour, she participated in the cow milking contest.

After about 15 minutes, it was time to head to Monroe, Kaitlyn had some milking to do soon!  We saw a few more barn quilts on the way back. Be sure to watch the video for the full, unabridged tour.

Thanks, Kris and Lynn for a great tour, I hope to see you in 2020 during Cheese Days!

 

Yerkes Observatory in William’s Bay-Our Last Tour


5-21-18  Closed-Oct. 1st, 2018

Watch tour we took below.

We had just recently heard the news that Yerkes Observatory will be closing on October 1st of this year and knew we had to hurry back to take another tour before they ended.  The news had just been announced a week or two earlier.

My first visit was actually in 6th grade in February 1977. Here is a picture I took then.

We went together for the first time in 2012. Richard Dreiser has been giving almost all of the tours since 1980, 38 years!  Six years later, he said he remembered us and was happy to see us again.  He is really nice and we will miss him. He is writing a book though about Yerkes so we look forward to getting that when it’s published.

It wasn’t really crowded since the news only just came out about the closure a week or so earlier. We heard that the tour groups in September were quite large. We could look around the hallway shortly before the tour started.

The back of the hallway was cordoned off, it wasn’t in 2012. Let’s see what is back there.

Richard began by showing some beautiful photos taken by the Yerkes telescope and others in the hallway adjacent to the lobby.

After discussing these photos, we then moved out to the lobby. It is quite beautiful, decorated with terracotta accents, marble floor and a skylight in the ceiling. The light fixtures are original too. The building was officially opened in 1897.

Al Kutil

Under the skylight.

Richard pointed out the many features in the decorative artwork of the building in the lobby area.  Faces, angels, and owls abound!

We then moved outside, where Richard pointed out the many distinguishing features in the artwork on the columns and above the door. Art is everywhere at this building, something you don’t see anymore.

Then, we went back in and concluded the tour at the big telescope. We could not go up on the platform on this visit.

Yerkes had been visited by many scientists, including Albert Einstein in this group photo taken in the 20’s.

We all got a special treat that most people don’t get to see, the dome rotating (see video at 48:33).  He went to the console on the right side of the dome and made the adjustments.

 

 

Laurie Kutil 2012

Our tour came to a conclusion 10 minutes later, Richard spent the remaining time answering questions. Went back down the stairs.

Saw the library and stopped in the gift shop.

Our visit concluded here. We are sad this valuable resource is no longer a part of the University in Chicago.  However, it may reopen again at later date under new ownership. I will update this post if this happens. We hope Richard will be hired to continue his excellent tours. Meanwhile, enjoy the video of the original tour.

Have Your Photo Struck at H.H. Bennett Studio in the Wisconsin Dells


7-25-18

Our last old-fashioned picture was in 2008, also on Broadway but not here. It was at Professor Samuel S. Porter’s Old-Time Portraits.

To treat ourselves for our 19th wedding anniversary that occurred the day before, we arranged to get a tintype picture at the famous H.H. Bennett Studio on Broadway in the Wisconsin Dells.  Our Photographer was David Rambow, expert in wet-plate photography since 2001. He is also Site Director for Wisconsin Historic Sites under the umbrella of the Wisconsin State Historical Society. We booked it well in advance at the H.H. Bennett website, deposit is $50. From there you can choose your package and complete your payment during your sitting.

We arrived at 10:30 for our 11 AM sitting, ready to be impressed! I had picked out clothing we had that looked sufficiently “period”, late 1800’s. My lace collar that I wore over my blouse was crocheted by my Grandma Tauchen when they were in style in the 1980’s!

Dave greeted us warmly and invited us to the very studio where Bennett made the Dells famous in the 19th and 20th centuries. This is how the backdrop looks in color.

Behind the chairs are head braces to help you hold still while the picture is taken. This is a long exposure photo.  The darker the studio, the longer the exposure. Since it was a bright sunny day, it only took 6 seconds.

 Photographer Robert Squires was there too and documented our visit. Thanks for the great photo!  He got a picture of Dave installing the prepared wet plate into the camera.  It takes 3-minutes to get it camera-ready after exposure to the chemicals. There is no going back once it is preparing!

 

Dave graciously allowed us to shoot video of getting our photo “struck” so we could show everyone how it’s done! See it below.

We had a great time doing this amazing photo, and they said Al looked like a Civil War vet. We were sent a digital copy ahead of the photo that would be sent in the mail to us.

On August 1st we received our photo in the mail.  It was varnished to help protect it from scratches.  It was beautiful! On the back was David’s info about the photo.

Also some information on how the photo was made.

I already had a frame to put the photo into that looked good with it.

Don’t pass up your opportunity to get a tintype photo taken by David at THE H.H. Bennett Studio!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olblich Garden’s 3rd Annual GLEAM


9-15-17

Photo by Olbrich Botanical Gardens

Each year I eagerly look forward to Olbrich Botanical Garden‘s hottest new art display taking place at night. They really outdid themselves this time. Here is a map of all the art installations, more than ever this year!

For the first time, there are displays inside of the Boltz Conservatory. This display cycles through all the colors, just like the lights lining the inside of the conservatory.

Next I went outside to see those displays, the tree outside was raining light!

There is now a bar outside so you can enjoy an adult beverage while enjoying GLEAM.

 There was a surprise around every corner, I especially liked the columns on either side of the entrance to the Rose Garden, there were roses rotating around inside.

Loved the rainbow brick path.

Projected onto the path in the grand circle were messages, and butterflies flew through them.

New this year were lighted panels with a description of the displays. This one was really neat.

The star shower light made for a ghostly appearance of anyone standing under it.

This one was a little hard to take a picture, video is better.

This one was pretty too.

I am finishing my journey through the gardens, looking completely different from in the day.  As a member, it is $11 to come to GLEAM, 14 if you are not.  You can become a member at Olbrich at this time for a discount and save on future events, coupon is on GLEAM guide. I look forward to next year!

 

Columbus Redbud Days – Welcome Spring!


5-13-17

It’s the time of year Columbus has been waiting for, Redbud Days.  This annual celebration celebrates the Redbud tree, prominently displayed all over the city. Read more about the history here.   Many of the redbuds are descended from one especially hardy tree that lived over 60 years, it was on 537 West James street. It lived from the 1940’s until it had to be cut down in 2001. It’s unique genetic makeup was preserved and the tree’s “children” are all over Columbus, 48 on city property alone.

We began the day by visiting some of the great garage sales around town. Found some great buys and had fun!  Many people had redbuds in their yard, some quite large.

Back downtown for all the fun!  Every year, a new Redbud Prince and Princess are chosen in a competition by children entering the contest. The ceremony was at the Columbus Senior Center.

Each child is interviewed and a panel of Judges choose the winners.  See the ceremony here.

The kids were wonderful and all are fine representatives of Columbus. They will all go far.

Redbud Royal Court 2017

Plenty going on outside also.  The Badger Antique Auto Club had a Car Show, sponsored by Carol Valley C.P.A.  S.C.P.

Behind the car show Columbus businesses displayed their wares.

Cooley Prop and Weld, LLC

Mid-State Equipment

I smell something good!   It must be the Kiwanis Brat Fry, time for lunch!

, kids were participating in the Chalk Walk outside. Pretty good drawings!

Welcome spring at Columbus Redbud Days!

Pringle – Elk Capitol of South Dakota


4-26-17

Pringle isn’t just a potato chip, it’s the self-proclaimed Elk Capitol of South Dakota. We didn’t see any  🙂  If you do, this is what they look like. We saw them earlier in the day elsewhere.

The population is a teeming 112 people, located in Custer County.  Below is a map of the community.

This community has a bike sculpture, you don’t see those everywhere!

Also the famous Hitch Rail Bar and Restaurant. It is a popular place!

AND, there is a historic log cabin and former stagecoach stop close by.

That’s all there is!

The Crazy Horse Memorial-Tribute to All Native American Tribes


4-26-17

When you are near the Crazy Horse Memorial

you will see a sign for a low power radio station describing what is going on there.

We tuned in, you can listen here. The drive up the Avenue of the Chiefs built our anticipation for a great visit!

Here is a short film giving an overview of this monumental project.

The project was began in 1948 by Sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski and the legacy continues today by his children.

Admission is $28 for per vehicle with more than 2 people.  That fee is waived during special events where food donations are accepted instead.

The grounds are beautiful with a great view of the carving-in-progress. There is a museum and the Laughing Water Restaurant where you can enjoy Indian Taco and other traditional Native American foods. We enjoyed a great dinner there! Pictured is the taco, Tatanka (Bison) Stew, and  fry bread with wojapi (warm berry sauce) for a yummy dessert!

Begin your self-guided tour of the extensive museum at the information desk, the people there are happy to answer your questions!

There are a great many rooms to explore, you can make a day of it here! The main deck is a great viewpoint of Crazy Horse, you can see all the action when work is being done. There is also a scale model of what it will look like when complete on the deck. This model is in the display room  behind me.

This room is the first one you see after coming off the main deck near the restaurant.

In this room is a bin of rocks from the monument that you can take for free!

The scale model showing what it will look like when finished. Al and I may not live long enough though to see that day unless they get a LARGE influx of money. This is being built entirely on donations.

Here are some other highlights in the rest of the building.

Inside of the teepee.

 

This was a surprise, a signed Packer football there 🙂

Korczak display room with artifacts from the family and early carvings.

A painting of Korczak at age 73.

This display room has a great many Native American artifacts from many tribes.

More to see downstairs.

It was thrilling seeing a real one on the way there!

We were reaching the conclusion of our tour.  As we prepared to go, we saw a bus taking people out to the base of the mountain. We were a little too tired to do that today, but planning on it next time.